We Used A Forklift To DROP The Off-Road Lamborghini Huracan And See What Happens

In todays episode were repairing and improving both of the trailing arms on the #Jumpacan. And then were getting a forklift to raise it up in the air and drop it to see how the suspension does.

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Music:
Fareoh – Cloud Ten

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Author: phillyfinestnews

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27 thoughts on “We Used A Forklift To DROP The Off-Road Lamborghini Huracan And See What Happens

  1. yup. I think you found the root cause. Definitely needed some more ride height as well though. Just make sure you increase ride height enough on top of the new BLOCK height of your spring. So if your heavier spring has a 0.25" higher block height than the old one, I hope you get at least another 0.5" of compression travel out of your new spring + collar adjustments. You'll still only have about 0.25" of wiggle room though and that will put a lot of importance into your hydraulic bump stop settings. Some springs like SWIFT have a shorter block height than others but not always. Check with multiple spring manufactures on the same rate and length to see the difference. I had to go thru a similar experiment with rear shock travel on my Honda S2000 for racing but didn't drop the car with a forklift. I had an odd sudden oversteer under compression while in turn where the rear end would just loose grip in a hard transition. I took some measurements. Increased spring rates but also paid close attention to their block height and went with Hyperco springs. I installed the springs at a little higher ride height than before and did some real world testing and hit bump going over a bridge at different speeds to see how hard I could hit it until I'd get too deep into the bump stop. I eventually had to just hit it at 80mph without the bump stops on the shocks to see if I'd really ever fully compress the shock. I found out that if I even really hit something hard enough to block the springs, they'd block first, before my shock ran out of travel leaving about 0.25" left of shock compression travel. I cut down my bump stops to give me most of the travel though. If you're serious about racing an S2000, don't get shocks that have the same body dimension as stock like KW clubsports do. You wont like your end result ride height with 750lb springs.

  2. I’m a mechanical engineer. I’m fairly confident if you put a laser on the 4 frame pivot points for the rear suspension on either side you will find the forward lower pivot is not on the same plane as the other 3. If all 4 pivots are not on the same plane in space your suspension will bind. I think with all the reinforcing plates the alignment of that particular pivot point got a little off. That bolt was just the weakest link.

  3. The breakage was not your fault just an initial “bad engineering” ( not saying it in a bad way it happens on prototypes like your) bolts like that are not made to take leverage as they did. Those bolts can hold like 20 tons each sandwiched between two plates but can brake “easily” if you use them to stand leverage. Your problem should be fixed. Can’t wait to see that beast racing.

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