How ‘All in the Family’ and ‘The Jeffersons’ changed TV

The stars from “Live in Front of a Studio Audience” performance of the two Norman Lear classics join “Nightline” to discuss the cultural and historical significance of the two iconic series.

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28 thoughts on “How ‘All in the Family’ and ‘The Jeffersons’ changed TV

  1. I saw All in the family in reruns on Nick at Night when I started college in the early 2000s, and found it hysterical because I got it. The show was defusing racism, not encouraging it. Norman Lear tapped into a deep seated truth in American Culture back in the early 1970s, that there is a bigot and a racist in every house in America, and that we need to expose those outdated sentiments by pulling it out into the open and showing it for the stupidity it is. Furthermore, Archie, while flawed, was a fundamentally decent person. He was just brought up with all the wrong beliefs. I think that it’s good to show the difference, and all in the family showed the difference as Archie was all talk. The Jefferson was also a great show by having a successful black businessman, showing that black people can succeed in life. It broke ground with it’s first portrayal of a biracial couple, something that was unheard of in 1970s America. Both shows are timeless classics and need to be seen. RIP Carroll O’Connor, Jean Stapleton, Sherman Hemsley, and Isabel Sandford, none of you will be forgotten.

  2. Two incredible shows. Will never say TV such as this ever again. Everyone is offended by everything.
    For the love of God creampuffs…
    Get a F'N testosterone shot and let's have fun again

  3. The genius Norman Lear stole the idea of All in the Family from a popular British show. As a show it followed all the same tropes from any sit-com before and since only with more yelling. (which passed for comedy). This segment is interesting as it praises the audience for being so bold as to watch these shows. Too bad you couldn't get someone with a knowledge of TV history, a tv critic, a historian, or someone with an independent idea. Great video.

  4. In theory, live remakes should be a great way to bring back a moment in time. The problem is, it fell flat because while the remake actors are great, the original cast had made these characters their own; together, they had a certain chemistry. Even John Amos playing Fred Davis felt off. Monumentally important television that still stands the test of time.

  5. Does anyone know if any of the All In The Family cast members ever guest starred on The Jefferson's by any chance? I'd be ever so curious to know this. I would like to hope & think they did, being that the Jefferson family originally came from the Bunker's neighborhood.

  6. Both reboots are futile bullshit. Why can't writers just create a NEW ground-breaking shows instead of regurgitating things that were relevant in the 70s?? Just hearing the names of the cast members for the reboot bothered me immensely.
    Even Jennifer Hudson's cover of "Movin' on Up" was verily depressing.
    i just feel like these reboots should NOT have happened and i wish for them to fade DEEP into obscurity.

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