Behind Bars: Rookie Year: Ariel Responds to a Power Outage (Season 1, Episode 7) | A&E

CO Montoya describes stepping up to the plate to deal with a power outage in this web exclusive from “Sink or Swim.”
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Behind Bars: Rookie Year
Season 1
Episode 107
Sink or Swim

With high attrition and a constant shortage of men and women up to the task, this series will follow a class of new correction officers in the California prison system as they begin their 60-day probation period.

A&E leads the cultural conversation through high-quality, thought provoking original programming with a unique point of view. Whether it’s the network’s distinctive brand of award-winning disruptive reality, groundbreaking documentary, or premium scripted drama, A&E always makes entertainment an art. Visit us at aetv.com for more info.

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Author: rafaelnieves72

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49 thoughts on “Behind Bars: Rookie Year: Ariel Responds to a Power Outage (Season 1, Episode 7) | A&E

  1. I just recently got a job as a Extradition Agent-Prisoner Transport. Transporting all over nationwide. All 50 states including Hawaii, Alaska, Puerto Rico and the US Virgin Islands. Gonna be crazy but I feel like I’m ready. This show is what got me thinking of either becoming a CO or what I’m doing now while I’m waiting to get into the police academy

  2. God bless you sister in blue. My sister-in-law worked at Rikers Island and retired after 36 years of service. She would be what others here have commented about your height and voice but don't listen to those jabronic meatheaded comments and keep doing your job young lady. Me NYPD retired so I can relate.

  3. The first mistake in a fight is underestimating your opponent. I’ve seen female officers who are 120 lbs soaking wet take on 200+ lb grown men. You underestimate and assume that you “can take” someone, you’ve let your guard down which makes your vulnerable. It works both ways.

  4. The cuff strap at the end should have been disconnected and taken out of the cell before the cuffs. Also get a grip on the middle of the set as the second cuff is removed. Inmate like to "jack" cuffs.

  5. The job doesn't really put too much stress on you. Unless you allow yourself to be under stress. My suggestion is that Once you get off work, leave everything behind you.. go home with Fresh Start and don't be tedious…

  6. In order to help keep your spirit and soul safe while working at a prison or jail put a Zantac tablet and a very small amount of coffee grounds down as many sink drains as possible in your location. Thank you Corrections Officers.

  7. If she passed the test just like every other CO, then she deserves to be there. Now if they bent the rules for her a bit then she doesn’t deserve to be there. They are putting her life, the other CO’s life, and even the inmates life at risk.

  8. 🐈🐵🐈🐵🐈🐵🐈🐵🐈🐵🐈🐵🐈🐵🐈🐵🐈🐵🐈🐵🐈🐵🐈🐵🐈🐵🐈🐵🐈🐵🐈🐵🐈🐵🐈🐵🐈🐵🐈🐵🐈🐵🐈🐵🐈🐵🐈🐵🐈🐵🐈🐵🐈🐵🐈🐵🐈🐵🐈🐵🐈🐵🐈🐵🐈🐵🐈🐵🐈🐵🐈🐵🐈🐵🐈🐵🐈🐵🐈🐵🐈🐵🐈🐵🐈🐵🐈🐵🐈🐵🐈🐵🐈🐵🐈🐵🐈🐵🐈🐵🐈🐵🐈🐵🐈🐵🐈🐵🐈🐵🐈🐵🐈🐵🐈🐵🐈🐵🐈🐵🐈🐵🐈🐵🐈🐵🐈🐵🐈🐵🐈🐵🐈

  9. The real problem sits behind the mentality that is (or rather, isn't) being taught to the correctional staff. This person is, quite clearly, way too casual and lacking the necessary bit of hatred towards the scum behind bars. You can't be confident and impose respect without having a militaristic attitude when working with inmates, at least not as far as I know.

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