What South Korea’s new president means for North Korea l ABC News

Yoon Suk-yeol’s biggest challenge is the constant threat from North Korea, which has sped up its nuclear weapons program.

#ABCNews #SouthKorea #YoonSukYeol #윤석열 #NorthKorea

source

Author: avn bot

ANGELHOUSE © 2009 - 2020 | HOSTING BY PHILLYFINEST369 SERVER STATS| & THE IDIOTS ROBOT AND CONTROL INC. |(RSS FEED MODULE)| ALL YOUTUBE VIDEOS IS A REGISTERED TRADEMARK OF GOOGLE INC. THE YOUTUBE CHANNELS AND BLOG FEEDS IS MANAGED BY THERE RIGHTFUL OWNERS (AVNBLOGFEED.COM)

19 thoughts on “What South Korea’s new president means for North Korea l ABC News

  1. The Shim Sang-jo incident was a massive purge in North Korea from 1997 to 2000.
    From 1996 to 1997, a large number of people in the Democratic People's Republic of Korea were starved to death due to the great famine called the March of Suffering. Kim Jong-il, then the supreme leader of the Democratic People's Republic of Korea, was having a hard time dealing with a senior official who served during the Kim Il-sung era, his father.
    Kim Jong-il established a secret police organization called "Shim Hwa-jo" within the Ministry of Social Security (now the People's Security). Shim Hwa-jo meant to deepen the investigation of residents' careers and thoughts, especially taking advantage of the growing public's dissatisfaction due to the economic crisis and the famine. Kim Jong-il appointed Jang Sung-taek, then the first vice-president of the organization leadership of the Chosonno-dong party, to the group and immediately carried out a grand purge that victimized senior executives, aides and their relatives.
    Seo Kwan-hee, who was secretary of agriculture at the secretariat of the Central Committee of the Workers' Party of Korea, was publicly shot in downtown Pyongyang for responsibility for causing the famine. It is also said that Moon Seong-sul, who was also Jang Song-taek's political opponent, died while being bullied by Jang Song-taek. Shim Hwa-jo's bases reached hundreds of locations across the country and about 8,000 employees were in charge of the investigation. Finally, the number of people purged was about 25,000. Of these, 10,000 were killed and 15,000 were held in camps.
    Because the role of Shim Hwa-jo is similar to that of the Red Guards who were active during China's Cultural Revolution, the Shim Hwa-jo incident is sometimes called the Democratic People's Republic of Korea version of the Cultural Revolution along with the Red Flag Movement.

  2. The Shim Sang-jo incident was a massive purge in North Korea from 1997 to 2000.
    From 1996 to 1997, a large number of people in the Democratic People's Republic of Korea were starved to death due to the great famine called the March of Suffering. Kim Jong-il, then the supreme leader of the Democratic People's Republic of Korea, was having a hard time dealing with a senior official who served during the Kim Il-sung era, his father.
    Kim Jong-il established a secret police organization called "Shim Hwa-jo" within the Ministry of Social Security (now the People's Security). Shim Hwa-jo meant to deepen the investigation of residents' careers and thoughts, especially taking advantage of the growing public's dissatisfaction due to the economic crisis and the famine. Kim Jong-il appointed Jang Sung-taek, then the first vice-president of the organization leadership of the Chosonno-dong party, to the group and immediately carried out a grand purge that victimized senior executives, aides and their relatives.
    Seo Kwan-hee, who was secretary of agriculture at the secretariat of the Central Committee of the Workers' Party of Korea, was publicly shot in downtown Pyongyang for responsibility for causing the famine. It is also said that Moon Seong-sul, who was also Jang Song-taek's political opponent, died while being bullied by Jang Song-taek. Shim Hwa-jo's bases reached hundreds of locations across the country and about 8,000 employees were in charge of the investigation. Finally, the number of people purged was about 25,000. Of these, 10,000 were killed and 15,000 were held in camps.
    Because the role of Shim Hwa-jo is similar to that of the Red Guards who were active during China's Cultural Revolution, the Shim Hwa-jo incident is sometimes called the Democratic People's Republic of Korea version of the Cultural Revolution along with the Red Flag Movement.

Leave a Reply