How To Replace Ball Joints and Tie Rod Ends Honda Element/CRV

This is a pretty straightforward repair video. The real trick here is the method. I use a special tool that you can purchase or rent to get the job done. It makes things a lot easier, and it will allow you to do the replacement on the car, even though I remove the knuckle in this video.

If you wanted to use a Honda replacement part, this video does show you how to remove the knuckle/hub assembly so that you can do that. However, it would be a lot less expensive to just replace the ball joint as I demonstrate in this video.

Here’s a link to the Premium Member Video I mentioned of the right side replacement: https://www.ericthecarguy.com/exclusive-videos/73-exclusive-videos/2135-how-to-replace-ball-joints-and-tie-rod-ends-honda-element-crv-exclusive-video

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Thanks for watching!

Discussion about this video: https://www.ericthecarguy.com/kunena/18-The-EricTheCarGuy-Video-Forum/69947-how-to-replace-ball-joints-and-tie-rod-ends-honda-element-crv

Links

Powerbuilt Ball Joint Tool Kit: https://www.powerbuilt.com/products/21-piece-ball-joint-u-joint-service-kit-kit-24?variant=42418719684#PbjYugVLygPicx4d.97

Another Ball Joint Tool: https://jbtoolsales.com/astro-pneumatic-7865-ball-joint-service-kit#oid=1002_1

Ball Joint Separator: https://jbtoolsales.com/otc-6297-ball-joint-separator#oid=1002_1

Pickle Fork: https://jbtoolsales.com/otc-6535-ball-joint-separator#oid=1002_1

DeWalt 3/8” Impact: https://jbtoolsales.com/dewalt-dc823ka-3-8-18v-cordless-impact-wrench-kit#oid=1002_1

Ball Joint: https://www.amazon.com/Moog-K500004-Ball-Joint/dp/B001ILHNSC/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1520440957&sr=8-2&keywords=2004+Honda+element+ball+joint

Tie Rod End: https://www.amazon.com/Moog-ES80995-Tie-Rod-End/dp/B001FE7I0U/ref=sr_1_9?s=automotive&ie=UTF8&qid=1520440994&sr=1-9&keywords=2004+Honda+tie+rod

Related Videos

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Honda Element/CRV 110K Service (Part 1): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fMplrMKIIoo&t=7s

Honda Element/CRV 110K Service (Part 2): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gciwVamERn0

How To Reset Honda Element Maintenance Light: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LRMax93CjzA

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Honda Element/CRV Thermostat Replacement: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z0vWv2Jwn3A&t=342s

How To Change Power Steering Fluid Honda Element: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Iev1xIr345Y

Honda Element Front Stabilizer Link Replacement: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GYosZGby0-I

Honda Element Lower Control Arm Bushing Replacement: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fpaIvEN57Jg

Finding and Repairing Rear End Noise Honda Element: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SRYfxRym-Kw

Honda Element Hood Cable Replacement: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rDF9g9BKYCM

Honda Element HID Headlight Installation: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OB-KQIySb7w

How To Install Projector Beam Headlights: https://youtu.be/c0Gv35pas5Y

Battery Care and Maintenance: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MhnVZ7ZPunw&t=13s

New Grill for my 2004 Element (Bumper Removal Detail): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Bg0PGM3SrY

How To Install Element Fog Lights (Part 1): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kvOez4RCyn8

How To Install Element Fog Lights (Part 2): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rINkzWHgCTM

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ETCG

Due to factors beyond the control of EricTheCarGuy, it cannot guarantee against unauthorized modifications of this information, or improper use of this information.  EricTheCarGuy assumes no liability for property damage or injury incurred as a result of any of the information contained in this video. EricTheCarGuy recommends safe practices when working with power tools, automotive lifts, lifting tools, jack stands, electrical equipment, blunt instruments, chemicals, lubricants, or any other tools or equipment seen or implied in this video.  Due to factors beyond the control of EricTheCarGuy, no information contained in this video shall create any express or implied warranty or guarantee of any particular result.  Any injury, damage or loss that may result from improper use of these tools, equipment, or the information contained in this video is the sole responsibility of the user and not EricTheCarGuy®.

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40 thoughts on “How To Replace Ball Joints and Tie Rod Ends Honda Element/CRV

  1. Eric brilliant video, told to go and buy a complete control arm by my garage only to see your video showing that the ball joint is attached to the hub casting assy,you saved me a few quid there, you are very clear and great communication thro the video,thanks bud, Chris, worcestershire uk.

  2. Hey man how did you install the new ball joint without changing the direction of the press? Like, what are you pressing on from the bottom to make the joint push in from the top?

  3. Hey Eric what were the symptoms that lead to changing out the part? Always enjoy all your videos. If I have a rubbing sound in the front end when I turn left at a 45° angle will greasing any fitting help? Ever think of moving to San Diego? 🙂 great video 👍

  4. Great video! Just wondering—why didn’t you change the inner tie rod as well? I’m having this dilemma with my 06 civic. The outer tie rods are shot, but I’m not confident to tackle the inners.

  5. Could have removed that ball joint in 15 seconds with a hammer instead of removing the knuckle. A few whacks around where the ball joint presses in and a few more upward to the bottom of the stud pops these right out.

  6. I need to do the to my 2004 Element. Dealer wants $646 for both sides. You are absolutely right they don’t sell the ball joints by themselves. You need to buy the steering knuckle. Which do recommend for ball joints or should I just let the dealer install them. Local mechanic will charge me $75 per side and I supply the ball joints. Thanks

  7. Would you recommend adding more grease to the non serviceable ball joint before you replace the boot and what type of grease would you recommend using?

  8. This video was very helpful as I am having to replace the lower control arm, the strut assembly and some other things after my mother crashed her car into a curb. The axle nut is 36mm, and I got lucky and had no problem getting the abs sensor out of the knuckle. One issue that I had is that I did not "Unstake" the axle nut before I hit it with the impact wrench. It came off fine, but it must have buggered the axle threads, cause I didn't smash the crap out of the end of the axle while removing it from the knuckle. I was very careful to not pound away on the axle but the old axle nut (Which I would replace anyway), does not wanna go back on and I am not going to force it or cross thread it. I have no problem replacing the cv axle if need be and I am going to try and clean up the axle threads I have before I do go that route. The only thing that could gave buggered the threads is the "Unstaked" axle nut. Just an FYI for those that have to do this work.

  9. Is there any way to screw up a ball joint install? If it’s seated correctly in the control arm and then you got bolt on and cotter pin in? Just wondering I did my first ball joint and I’m worrying for no reason. Just looking for peace of mind haha. It is pulling to the side I changed the ball joint on but I’m assuming an alignment is all it needs now?

    Replaced both front struts and left lower ball joint. Dodge Caliber 2007

  10. HAVE WIFES MAZDA MPV AND BALL JOINT WENT BAD ( DRIFTING WHEELS) I HAVE BALL JOINT PRESS KIT BUT NOTICED THAT FROM FACTORY THE BALL JOINT COMES TACKED WELDED AND DONT KNOW WHY THE HECK ANYONE WOULD DESIGN IT THAT WAY ANYHOW TO BREAK THOSE WELDS YOU RECOMMEND ANYTHING BETTER THAN MY WAY WHICH IS GONNA HAVE TO GO OUT AND BUY A GRINDER AND CUT THE WELDS. ANYTHING BETTER THAN MY IDEA WOULD BE GREAT THANK YOU.

  11. Hey Eric, I just installed some new upper control arms with new ball joints on my 2009 Ford Crown Vic. Once I put the ball joints into the knuckle and then tightened them down with the nut. I noticed that the boot of the ball joint kind of spun in a tightening motion as I was tightening it down, is that normal or OK

  12. I appricate this video but I have a question. I have a 2006 CRV and when I follow the link for the ball joint and the tie rod end Amazon is saying that this part does not fit you car. Now the 2004 and 2006 CRV are exactly the same so do you think I should just buy these parts?

  13. Hi thanks for the information, i'm wondering if astro Kit #7897 will install ball joint for Honda CRV 2006, i know Hondas will require special adapter for ball joints removal, does the astro 7897 set have the adapter? Thanks

  14. I use a ratchet strap hanging down off the lower arm in a loop. Then I stand on the bottom of it to bring the arm down and out of the way.

  15. Anybody else squinting while he gives a close up of the penetrating oil being sprayed? Don't want to get it in my eyes.

  16. Helpful video as ever. Thanks Eric! I thought the new one you installed is a "sealed" (non-greaseable) type, but the rubber cover is not completely sealed to the bolt, right?

  17. Did the ball joint job in my one car garage yesterday. Couple of tips to add to the great video:
    1. If you don't have a lift, you have to get the car up really high on the jack-stands, in order to get the ball joint press to fit between the steering knuckle and floor of the garage (don't plan on getting an impact under there, you will have to wrench it and I recommend a large cresent wrench for a perfect fit on the press' rod).
    2. I couldn't get the castle nut on balljoint rod approach to work in order to remove the old ball joint. It kept slipping. Nor did the air-hammer approach work (by-itself, I did have success starting with a press and punching out with the air-hammer). Instead I put an deep impact socket over the ball-joint rod at the bottom. It was just barely long enough to hold the ball joint threaded rod also also fit onto the balljoint housing to push. With the shallow a-symmetrical receiving cup from the press kit I was able to get both ball-joints out on the first try.
    3. Putting the new ball joint in was straight forward as Eric shows. However keep in mind when you're not using an impact, you have to wrench this thing. And it takes hundreds of pounds of force on the wrench even when you have the press setup to apply equal pressure. In my one car garage- I was able to brace my back against a wall, put a foot against the hub to hold it steady, and pull as hard as I could. I don't know how I could have done it otherwise.
    4. Lastly, you have to press the balljoint in and turn that wrench until it literally will not turn anymore, even with a helper pipe on the end of the wrench, that's how you know its fully seated and the snap-ring will fit in its place.

  18. I go to parts store and ask for a ball joint separator. One that pushes the joint apart without destroying the boots. Like the one I'm pointing at, but bigger. He rolls his eyes and says "you mean a pickle fork?"

    Moral of the story, some parts store guys don't know it all like they act they do.

  19. Many people can fix cars well. Many people can make good instructional videos. But not many people can make good, accurate, complete, yet not-too-lengthy videos on how to perform car repair. I appreciate your dedicated work.

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