DMVs are selling personal data for millions, report says



A new report from Vice reveals that state motor vehicle departments are making millions of dollars selling drivers’ personal information. Joseph Cox, senior staff writer for Vice Motherboard, joined CBSN AM to talk about the findings.

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36 Comments

  1. In 1974 my employer wanted employees to sign a form to allow the DMV to sell (they didn't use the word sell but we knew what was going on) our information. Don't know what the other employees did in the other departments but ours literally told them to shove it. And it just keeps getting worse & I still tell business/government to shove it including RadioShack in the 70`s who is bankrupt now. WONDER WHO HAS ALL THAT DATA NOW?

  2. Put in a California Consumer Privacy Act request to find out who has sold what data about you. And then request they not share/sell your data.

  3. @UCUHXjLUaAk1940mSXsN3JLw

    @UCUHXjLUaAk1940mSXsN3JLw

    @

    I usually find VICE's reports to be well-researched and articulately described, but that's not the case this time.

    Yes, Private Investigators can go through DMV vendors to obtain some driver's license information. It's only permitted in specific circumstances, and you have to declare what you're using it for. Legal uses might include fraud prevention or process service.

    The DMV charges a fee to access their records because they have to make an effort to prove the data is being used legitimately. That costs money. Someone has to oversee the distribution of information in a secure environment, and that costs money, too. I highly doubt the DMVs across the country are "making millions" by providing access to this information.

    It is possible that this information is being misused or obtained by people who do not have a legal application for the information obtained. Point your outrage at those abusing the system and breaking the law. Not every P.I. falls into this category.

    I feel like this is an alarmist report. There's nothing wrong going on here. The information is already regulated. It's securely requested and transmitted. Whether or not the information is being misused is far less common than they make it out to be and it's a completely separate issue. Misuse already has consequences. Perhaps enforcing existing laws a little more stringently would make the public more comfortable.

    I would invite you to read how the California DMV uses your information and what information may be available to Private Investigators.

    @t

  4. @UCUHXjLUaAk1940mSXsN3JLw

    @UCUHXjLUaAk1940mSXsN3JLw

    @

    I usually find VICE's reports to be well-researched and articulately described, but that's not the case this time.

    Yes, Private Investigators can go through DMV vendors to obtain some driver's license information. It's only permitted in specific circumstances, and you have to declare what you're using it for. Legal uses might include fraud prevention or process service.

    The DMV charges a fee to access their records because they have to make an effort to prove the data is being used legitimately. That costs money. Someone has to oversee the distribution of information in a secure environment, and that costs money, too. I highly doubt the DMVs across the country are "making millions" by providing access to this information.

    It is possible that this information is being misused or obtained by people who do not have a legal application for the information obtained. Point your outrage at those abusing the system and breaking the law. Not every P.I. falls into this category.

    I feel like this is an alarmist report. There's nothing wrong going on here. The information is already regulated. It's securely requested and transmitted. Whether or not the information is being misused is far less common than they make it out to be and it's a completely separate issue. Misuse already has consequences. Perhaps enforcing existing laws a little more stringently would make the public more comfortable.

    I would invite you to read how the California DMV uses your information and what information may be available to Private Investigators.

    @t

  5. As I licensed and heavely regulated Private Investigator who follows all laws in this regard, I am interested to learn what permissible purpose this reporter was able to circumvent DPPA (Driver's Privacy Protection Act) to conduct his investigation??

  6. This guy has no idea about what he is talking about. I hear a British accent, so I assume he comes from the UK. The UK, as everyone knows, has no public records laws. So, he appears to be shocked with all the information readily available in the US.

  7. All our Data is being sold!! My RING doorbell sold data to a bank where I applied for a Mortgage, I know because the Bank asked about an odd address – to see if I owned it. I scratched my head & then remembered that when I was installing my RING doorbell, it wouldn't accept the real address so I made one up – to make it work AND THAT was the address the Bank was querying. I asked them how they got the address & they refused to say and I had to sign a letter saying I had no interest – in the made up address!!! I kid you not!! My bloody doorbell sold my info, and it has all that video of my comings and goings, people we need to do something. I'm hoping we vote in Andrew Yang, he not only wants us to all be owners of our own data, (has policies drafted), he wants to tax the big Tech companies and pay us back in the form of UBI, $1,000 a month for every US Citizen! Data is the new Oil in the modern economy. We need a president cognizant of the new Revolution to lead us through. Check him out http://www.yang2020.com

  8. I usually find VICE's reports to be well-researched and articulately described, but that's not the case this time.

    Yes, Private Investigators can go through DMV vendors to obtain some driver's license information. It's only permitted in specific circumstances, and you have to declare what you're using it for. Legal uses might include fraud prevention or process service.

    The DMV charges a fee to access their records because they have to make an effort to prove the data is being used legitimately. That costs money. Someone has to oversee the distribution of information in a secure environment, and that costs money, too. I highly doubt the DMVs across the country are "making millions" by providing access to this information.

    It is possible that this information is being misused or obtained by people who do not have a legal application for the information obtained. Point your outrage at those abusing the system and breaking the law. Not every P.I. falls into this category.

    I feel like this is an alarmist report. There's nothing wrong going on here. The information is already regulated. It's securely requested and transmitted. Whether or not the information is being misused is far less common than they make it out to be and it's a completely separate issue. Misuse already has consequences. Perhaps enforcing existing laws a little more stringently would make the public more comfortable.

    I would invite you to read how the California DMV uses your information and what information may be available to Private Investigators.

    https://www.dmv.ca.gov/portal/dmv/detail/dl/how_info_shared

  9. BTW the DMV in my state will not release my address information to anyone or so they say and they verify the address I give them as being my home address. If they violate my trust I WILL sue them for millions and win!

  10. This article is a phony and a fraud. The DPPA provides more than adequate protections and penalties for misuse of sensitive DMV data. This guy doesn't know what he's talking about.

  11. CBS NEWS: Please investigate whether or not the US Post Office, who is currently taking pictures of everybody's letter sized mail, is sending those photos to the NSA. Basically, violating the Constitutional rights of American citizens if doing so. AND, would postage be cheaper if the US Post Office wasn't taking pictures of everybody's letter sized mail? How could it not be?

  12. Stop them by suing them and read all fine print before signing anything or don't give them the info you don't want them to have , get a p o box to use , use your imagination and ideas that are legal for you to use against them , so they can't trap you in their sneaky webs .

  13. Mate do you know how long the American government has been using and selling your info? What’s surprising to me is that you’re unaware and don’t seem to care…until it’s too late

  14. I guess it's not really our data when it can be bought and sold.this is one of those things people will have to demand to be changed or it will not be.

  15. When I was a police explorer in the 1970's, I walked into a detectives' office and saw a massive collection of high school and jr. high school yearbooks (multiple copies) going back for many years. It wasn't arbitrary or haphazard. Yearbook publishers were automatically mailing them out.

    Years later I realized that the police had the names and “mug shots” and general locations of tens of thousands of innocent children who had never committed any crime.

    There are too many right-wing extremists, war hawks, psychopaths, and sociopaths in government who tend to hire other right-wing extremists, war hawks, psychopaths, and sociopaths. If it is not expressly prohibited, they can and will do it.

Comments are closed.